The Importance of Estate Planning

Frannie is a 92-year-old low income woman who lives alone. She was concerned about her heirs and how they would receive her assets after her passing. That’s when she reached out to St. Ambrose to have a will prepared.

She told her St. Ambrose attorney that her husband had died, after which she sold their marital home. In total, she had approximately $70,000 in liquid funds from the sale of the home. She had worked with her husband for decades to establish their equity and she wanted to ensure that the funds would go to her chosen heirs.

Medical issues left Frannie with limited mobility so an attorney visited her in her new rental apartment. The attorney provided advice and counseling about estate planning. He reviewed her asset and financial documentation and told Frannie what was already taken care of in her estate plan and what still needed to be done. To tie up all of the loose ends, the attorney prepared a will for Frannie in her own home during the visit.   

After this brief in-home meeting, Frannie had an ironclad estate plan. She now knows where all of her assets will go after she passes away. The attorney also enabled her to avoid the probate process for as many of her assets as possible, saving her heirs time, money, and the headache that many experience while dealing with probate assets.

As always, if you are have any questions regarding estate planning, please call the Legal Services Department at St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center at 410-366-8550, ext. 209.

*Names have been changed to protect the identity of St. Ambrose clients.

Why Advance Healthcare Directives are Vital for Older Adults

Gerald had an upcoming high-risk surgical procedure. The 71-year-old Baltimore native needed a legal document to guide his health care providers in the event that something went wrong during the surgery. Gerald went to the Baltimore City Register of Wills where he was referred to St. Ambrose.

A St. Ambrose attorney prepared an advance directive for Gerald free of charge. This advance directive ensured that if there were a complication during the surgery, one of Gerald’s loved ones had the authority to make healthcare decisions on his behalf. It also allowed Gerald to dictate what kind of medical treatment he would receive ahead of time if he were to suffer a major debilitation.

Gerald walked into St. Ambrose’s office two days before his procedure. With such an urgent need, he was unable to secure legal services from other nonprofits with longer intake periods. He could not hire a private attorney because he lived on under $1,000 per month. From start to finish, St. Ambrose addressed Gerald’s needs in less than one hour.

Thankfully, Gerald’s procedure was a success. The fact that he had an advance directive ahead of time gave Gerald one fewer thing to worry about and the peace of mind so that he could focus on his health and recovery.

As always, if you are have any questions regarding housing law, please call the Legal Services Department at St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center at 410-366-8550, extension 209.

*Names have been changed to protect the identity of St. Ambrose clients.

How this Advocate jumped in to help St. Ambrose and never looked back

“When I was a law student looking for a summer job that didn’t involve standing in a file room or making copies for 10 hours a day, I came across the opportunity to apply for a public interest grant and St. Ambrose was one of the eligible sponsors. Vinnie Quayle was the contact so I reached out and we met for a few hours in his office one spring afternoon sharing war stories. Prior to that encounter, I had never stopped to think about how much depends on safe, stable and affordable housing; from children’s performance in schools to job stability, mental and physical health, safety and future financial security. St. Ambrose had just filed a lawsuit against a predatory lender preying on vulnerable minority communities in Baltimore at the time of our meeting. The stories of abusive lending practices were heart wrenching and infuriating. They were short staffed and up against large law firms on the defense side so I jumped in to help and really never looked back.

During my tenure as a law student and then attorney at St. Ambrose, there was a guiding statement featured prominently in the halls and in many individual offices that read: The temple stands unfinished until all are housed in dignity. This statement is a personification of the work accomplished from the rowhouse on 25th street and forever etched in my own conscience. For this perspective and for the freedom I had to grow and become a better person and lawyer, I will always be grateful and supportive. The work that is done and the lives impacted by the Agency deserve far more support than my nominal monthly donation. Giving a voice to those who are without and ensuring that the most vulnerable are housed in dignity has never been needed more in my lifetime than it is today and I hope others will give as generously as they can in support of this critical mission.

Every day at St. Ambrose, we help our families make themselves at home in strong, stable communities where they can develop relationships with neighbors and create stable home environments where their children are able to live, learn, and grow.

When people turn to St. Ambrose, your generosity ensures that we’re able to provide for them.  Whether it’s preparing someone to buy their first home, making it possible for an aging homeowner to continue to live in the neighborhood they know and love, or helping one generation care for the next, your support can help us change lives.

Monthly giving to St. Ambrose ensures that individuals and families have a pathway to secure, stable housing, which is critical today and every day. You can make sure the families and individuals that come to St. Ambrose have what they need to survive and thrive by mailing a check or by donating online. To become a monthly donor at St. Ambrose, please visit www.stambros.org/donate and select “Monthly” under Recurring Payment options.

Your generosity makes it possible for us to consistently provide the highest quality services to those who turn to us in times of need in order to ensure a brighter, better future for all.

“St. Ambrose staff works tirelessly to ensure that all persons are treated with dignity and integrity. They make sure that our neighbors are given their basic human rights and Constitutional processes when one illness, one death, one divorce or one job loss brings them to the brink of homelessness. I am very fortunate to have learned these principles at the very start of my legal career. I had never purchased a house, read the fine print of a credit card disclosure or car loan application. With all of the wisdom and arrogance of a 2nd year law student, I walked into my first client meeting in the row-house turned office on 25th street, expecting to impart great wisdom on my first client. Instead, I was the one that very quickly realized I had much to learn. I was mentored and supported by my St. Ambrose colleagues and Board Members from that day forward as I stumbled through many more client meetings, hearings and legislative sessions. I quickly learned that during down economic times, the voice of the most vulnerable amongst us is often the one first ignored and too quickly vilified. And I learned that it is up to all of us to stand up for those marginalized and fight for equality. St. Ambrose has never backed away from fighting for what is right and just and I am so grateful to have started my career on the right side of our evolving history.” – Anne Balcer

About Anne

I was born and raised in Northeast Baltimore in Mayfield. I lived in other parts of Baltimore City and County except for when I was in Virginia for my undergraduate degree and then ended up in Montgomery County, Maryland in 2013. I currently live in Kensington. My parents were children of Polish immigrants that landed in the Canton/Fells Point area of Baltimore City. My Mom went to the convent and my Dad to the seminary and both graduated but never took their respective vows. They met a few years later in a chemistry class at the University of Maryland where my Mom was studying pharmacy and my Dad medicine. My Mom passed away when I was young so it was up to my Dad to raise 3 girls on his own. I’m the youngest and he instilled in us a relentless work ethic and insistence on doing what is right even if it’s not popular. He came from very little and worked at Bethlehem Steel during the summer and a car garage during the school year to put himself through medical school. He remarried another Baltimore native, years later, and I was lucky enough to become the youngest of 6 total children, 4 are still in the Baltimore area. In terms of my immediate family today, I’m married to an incredibly supportive husband, Matt, a New Jersey native, and have two girls. Melli just turned 11 and is kind, compassionate and already a staunch advocate for social justice. Lucy is almost 2 and strong-willed (maybe a bit stubborn) and determined just like her older sister.

I’ve been fortunate to have the time and opportunity to coach my daughter Melli’s lacrosse team. It has been one of the most enjoyable and rewarding experiences to watch young girls develop confidence and teamwork that I know will help them navigate the difficulties of being a female in today’s world as they grow older. I also volunteer with local and national political campaigns. Having the right leaders in office and ensuring that our collective voices are heard through voting and demonstration is so critical to our future and that of my girls. Otherwise, my career as General Counsel for Congressional Bank, a community bank headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, and my family keeps me pretty occupied but I do sneak in some yoga, running, gardening, reading and cooking when I have a few spare minutes.

Tenant’s Rights: COVID-19 Fact Sheet

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions and resources for renters.

If you or someone you know is currently dealing with a landlord who is imposing self-help eviction or is not adhering to the executive order, call St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center for free legal advice and landlord-tenant counseling: (410)-366-8550 ext. 209.

  1. What is the eviction moratorium?
    1. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Larry Hogan has issued an emergency order (Executive Order 20-04-03-01), that prohibits Maryland courts from evicting tenants who can demonstrate they are suffering a financial loss due to COVID-19.
  2. What does this mean for tenants who are delinquent on their rent payments?
    1. A landlord can file for an eviction in court, however, because the Maryland court system is closed, the court system cannot process any open or recently filed eviction orders or cases. 
    2. Unfortunately, the eviction moratorium is a temporary fix and does not excuse tenants from paying rent. However, tenants who demonstrate their financial hardship can pay their rent at a later time.
  3. Examples of situations that demonstrate a tenant is suffering a financial loss due to COVID-19 (but not limited to):
    1. Diagnosed with or under investigation for COVID-19
    2. Lost or reduced unemployment benefits
    3. Needing to care for a school-aged child
  4. When will Maryland courts hear eviction cases?
    1. Even though the Governor’s office has not confirmed the end date for the eviction moratorium, the Maryland Courts will start to hear eviction, foreclosure, and “pay rent matters” on July 25th, 2020. Meaning, evictions can be issued once the courts open on July 25th, 2020. 
  5. What landlords cannot impose: self-help eviction
    1. Under the Maryland Code, Real Property, Section 8-216, landlords cannot use self-help methods to evict a tenant. Self-help eviction occurs when a landlord uses methods of intimidation to force the tenant to move out. These methods include: 
      • Cutting off utility services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage, phone, cable TV, and internet. 
      • Changing the locks so the tenant no longer has access to the property. 
      • Removing the tenant’s personal items from the property. 

Landlords CANNOT use methods of intimidation to evict a tenant. These methods include: Cutting off utility services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage, phone, cable TV, and internet, changing the locks, or removing the tenant’s personal items from the property. 

What renters can do:

  • If you were illegally evicted:
    • Call 911: 
    • File an emergency case:
      • “If you were illegally evicted, you may consider seeking legal assistance and filing a complaint in court against your landlord. Because the courts are only hearing emergency cases, the complaint should be filed as an emergency matter if you are trying to get back into the property.” Even though the court system is closed, the court has made an exception to hear emergency cases. 
      • During your time as an evicted tenant, you should keep track of all of the expenses you have accrued as a result of your illegal eviction. These expenses could include but are not limited to “hotel bills and lost property.”
    • Document communication with the landlord:
      • If you are experiencing COVID-19 related hardships that will affect your rent payments, you may consider writing a letter to your landlord. The letter would be part of a paper trail illustrating your situation and how your COVID-19 circumstance will affect your ability to pay rent. 
      • You may also consider keeping track of all of the communication between you and your landlord in regards to your COVID-19 circumstance. 
      • If the landlord agrees or disagrees to accommodate your financial situation, you should get that in writing.  
    • Call 211 for financial assistance:
      • If you are experiencing COVID-19 financial hardships, please call 211, text your zip code to 898-211 (service is only available to Maryland zip codes) or visit 211md.org for assistance. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and in over 180 languages. 

Conclusion

Under Executive Order 20-04-03-01, even if a tenant is unable to pay the rent, the landlord cannot evict their tenant.  Therefore, if a landlord uses self-help eviction methods in response to a tenant being unable to pay their rent due to their COVID-19 related financial loss, the landlord violated the executive order and imposed an illegal eviction.

Note: Once the courts open, it is unclear how the courts will respond to these unprecedented situations.

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If you or someone you know is currently dealing with a landlord who is imposing self-help eviction or is not adhering to the executive order, call St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center for free legal advice and landlord-tenant counseling: (410)-366-8550 ext. 209.

 

A Path Toward the Future

Stephen is a 23 year old young man who was born and raised in East Baltimore, Maryland. As a preteen, Stephen started exploring the City on his own and found himself making difficult decisions about the direction of his life and his health. Being a very private person who guards his family story and traumatic experiences close to his heart, Stephen knew he had to make some serious life changes. 

As a result of sleeping in his car for almost a year and a half, Stephen’s friend mentioned that St. Ambrose may be able to help. The path towards his future began with him being accepted into the Host Home Program at St. Ambrose. The process was a smooth transition for Stephen because it provided him a place to stay with a much higher level of comfort. He currently lives with a Host Home provider in West Baltimore with another associate of the St. Ambrose family. Today, Stephen is learning to become a professional driver.

If you are considering hosting a youth in your home, this is Stephen’s message to you: “I would like for people to have respect, faith, and patience with the youth and try to understand where they are coming from. Home to me is a place where you KNOW you can go anytime; somewhere you feel safe and comfortable.”

Interested in becoming a Host? Looking for new opportunities? Our Homesharing Department has been working throughout COVID-19 so that individuals and families alike can achieve security and stability while maintaining their health and safety.

To learn more, contact Homesharing at St. Ambrose today by calling 410-366-8550 ext. 248.

One Day at a Time

Jasmines’ story is one that resonates with many inner city youth.

Jasmine Garland, 20, was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland and has spent the majority of her life living in East Baltimore. Jasmine’s mother was not present in her life and her father was very inconsistent in his role as her parent so, she often spent her childhood being cared for by her loving Aunt Barbara. As a teenager, Jasmine worked hard to graduate from Reach Partnership High School in 2017 and continued her education with Baltimore City Community College. However, life experiences dealt Jasmine several roadblocks which caused her to halt her educational pursuits.

During this time, Jasmine found herself homeless and living on the streets of Baltimore in abandoned houses. One day, she made the decision to seek help from the Joy Baltimore Program directed by Mr. Lonnie Walker. It was difficult for some to believe that she was homeless because of the way she carried herself; but it was all true. Mr. Walker then introduced Jasmine to St. Ambrose. At the moment, Jasmine admits that this was the happiest she had ever been! She was about to finally be off the street and living in a home, which was an accomplishment Jasmine hadn’t imagined possible. Unfortunately, tragedy came knocking at Jasmines’ door and she learned that her dear Aunt Barbara had passed away. She would now be faced with living her life without the one person who had always been her guide. But Jasmine tried her best to move forward.

The grief and loss began to settle in and Jasmine started to become more and more depressed. At times, Jasmine found herself in a room where everyone was there to celebrate her accomplishments, but she still felt alone. St. Ambrose stepped in to provide therapeutic intervention and Jasmine decided to continue services to address those feelings of grief and loss, one day at a time. During this period, St. Ambrose helped Jasmine connect with a home provider who welcomed her into their safe place that she could call home.

Since then, Jasmine has transitioned from the home sharer’s home to a more independent St. Ambrose program call Hope House. Hope House houses youth (18-24) who need more than the 90 days that the Host Home Program offers to prepare them for long-term sustainable housing. Program participants live in one of our two Hope House properties and receive case management services from St. Ambrose staff. In Hope House, Jasmine shares a home of her own with one other Youth participant.

“The process was very difficult for me because I had to get used to living with other people and calling the house ‘my home’. When I was living in an abandoned building, I isolated myself from everyone, and I was comfortable that way.”

Jasmine’s message to those considering sharing their home is simple:

“If you allow someone to move into your home, please take the time to get to know the person and set clear rules and expectations. We, as youth, need guidance and structure, not indifference.”

Interested in becoming a Host? Looking for new opportunities? Our Homesharing Department has been working throughout COVID-19 so that individuals and families alike can achieve security and stability while maintaining their health and safety.

To learn more, contact Homesharing at St. Ambrose today by calling 410-366-8550 ext. 248.

 

Welcome New Legal Services Summer Intern!

We have a new addition to the St. Ambrose team! Please join us in welcoming Shereen Ibrahim as one of our new Legal Services Summer Interns.

“I am a student from the University of Baltimore School of Law. The legal fields I am interested in are environmental, constitutional and national security law.

I chose to clerk at St. Ambrose because I want to use my legal abilities to assist members of underserved communities navigate property decisions. As a law clerk, I will be assisting clients with their foreclosure process, review landlord and tenant issues, and prepare wills and deeds. Serving underprivileged communities is one of my ultimate goals as a attorney and being a law clerk at St. Ambrose is a great first step in my legal career.” -Shereen

Welcome to the team, Shereen!

A Message of Hope

God of our weary years, God of our silent tears. Thou who has brought us thus far on the way; Thou who has by thy might led us into the light keep us forever in the path, we pray.The Negro National Anthem

It was a tense time! We were in national crisis, and we didn’t know how we could ever move forward. A black man was dead, our inner-cities were in the midst of a housing and economic crisis, we were engulfed in a foreign war, and people young and old, took to the streets in protest. The year was 1968 and the murdered man was Dr. Martin Luther King, and many of us felt like we had lost all hope.

In the past weeks, our country and the world have been witnesses to the brutal murders of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery, confounded by the killing of Breonna Taylor, and felt the shame and sting of the blatant, weaponized, racist attack on Christian Cooper. For many of us, the events of the last few weeks have made us feel like we have come full circle – our communities dissected, our families destroyed, and our people crying out for justice.

Just over fifty years ago, St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center was created with the Civil Rights Movement as its backdrop. Our mission is to create and maintain equal housing opportunities for low- and moderate-income people, primarily in Baltimore City, and to encourage and support strong and diverse neighborhoods. We believed then that treating all people with respect and dignity was our responsibility and their opportunity to move forward. We believed our engagement with our community could help eradicate the systemic racial injustice that plagued our country. These beliefs are as true today as they were in 1968, and though we have accomplished much over the past fifty years, this week we are reminded that there is more to work to be done.

As we consider the events of the past month and walk through the days and weeks ahead, let us support each other as family, then turn outward and help our community. Let us commit to ensuring that the values and work for which St. Ambrose was created continues. And together we will march on till victory is won.

Yours in solidarity,

Gerard Joab, Executive Director

New video: Three things to know about paying rent during a pandemic: Information for Renters during COVID-19

St. Ambrose Staff Attorney Tim Darby talks about what renters need to know about Maryland’s current eviction laws and what they mean and how to have effective conversations with landlords.

As always, if you are having trouble dealing with your landlord, or have any other questions regarding housing law, please call the Legal Services Department at St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center at 410-366-8550, extension 209.

Legal Services at St. Ambrose copy 2

The COVID-19 Coronavirus outbreak has caused a lot of uncertainty for all Marylanders, particularly renters like Tim. If you are struggling to pay your rent in Maryland there are three things that you should know. Watch the video here.

  1. First, open and honest communication with your landlord is very important. Unless your landlord tells you otherwise, you still have an obligation to pay rent during this period of time. If you think you might not have rent money by the due date, get in touch with your landlord and explain what’s going on. They might be able to work with you to establish a payment plan or defer your rent payment to a later date, though it’s important to note that they are not legally obligated to do so. If you do work something out with your landlord, make sure to get it in writing.
  2. Even if you do not pay rent, your landlord can not legally evict you right now. Even before the coronavirus outbreak, landlords could not legally evict tenants without going through the court system and then paying the local sheriff’s office to conduct the eviction. Landlords can NEVER legally evict tenants without the help of the local sheriffs office. The governor of the state of Maryland has issued an order halting all residential evictions for the duration of the State of Emergency. We do not know when this State of Emergency will end. This means that right now, your landlord cannot legally force you out of your home, even if you have not paid rent or if you have been diagnosed with the coronavirus.
  3. Lastly: If you do miss a payment, you will still owe that money to your landlord, even though they cannot evict you right now. Our state court system is currently running limited operations, and every county and Baltimore City is handling matters differently. However, once your local district court opens up to rent court hearings, trials may be scheduled for those who have not paid their rent. If you get to this point, you are liable for unpaid rent and also maybe fees and court costs. If you do not have this money by the hearing date, your landlord may be able to begin working with the sheriffs office to schedule an eviction.

The most important thing to know is that your landlord CANNOT force you to leave your rental property during this state of emergency. If you are having trouble dealing with your landlord, or have any other questions regarding housing law, please call the Legal Services Department at St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center at 410-366-8550, extension 209.