10 Things to do if You are Facing Foreclosure

March 26, 2015 by
Based on MD DHCD 2014 4th quarter Foreclosure report

Based on MD DHCD 2014 4th quarter Foreclosure report

The St. Ambrose Legal Services department has compiled the following tips for what to do if you’re slipping towards foreclosure: 

  1. Ask for help as soon as you realize you are in financial trouble. The sooner you ask, the more likely you are to get the necessary support to resolve the problem.
  1. Stay in contact with your bank/lender so that they are aware of your situation. If you are upfront and transparent about your financial situation, your bank will better understand your needs and interests.
  1. Do not pay fees for services to assist you with your financial situation when the service is available for free. Thoroughly investigate anyone who is charging you for financial services and what they are doing for the fees.
  1. Take advantage of free services! The state and the banks will inform you of free counseling and legal services that are available to you.
  1. Do not take advice from friends, neighbors, or family, unless they are trained in financing.
  1. Open all of your mail, promptly. Don’t assume you already know what’s inside.
  1. There is no way to get out of the debt obligation. Don’t bother looking for a way out. Instead, determine if a loan modification is a viable option for you.
  1. Understand your responsibilities under the debt obligation. A deed of trust is the same thing as a mortgage. A deed is the document that transfers ownership of real estate.
  1. Know your rights and don’t sign any contracts unless you fully understand the document. You may be offered a ‘friendly foreclosure’ at mediation, but thoroughly research the implications of this sort of agreement before signing any contract.
  1. Do not think the problem will just go away. If you cannot afford your house, start considering what next steps you will take in order to find a new living space.

The threat of foreclosure can be intimidating, but being informed of your rights and responsibilities can make the process easier. Going through a foreclosure doesn’t mean losing everything. If you remain informed and proactive throughout the process you’ll be able to salvage the maximum amount of your investment. Find help, resolve the problem, and look ahead to life after foreclosure. Call St. Ambrose for free legal advice and foreclosure counseling: 410-366-8550 

Share a Home, Save for a Home

March 16, 2015 by

Our Homesharing department has been matching homeowners and home seekers for 27 years in the Baltimore area, but only recently have we been making a strong effort to encourage this affordable housing solution for single parents. We contacted Brandy, a homesharing mom who lives in Northeast Baltimore to tell us a little bit about her homesharing experience.parent child homesharing logo final

How old is your daughter?   4 years old

Length of time home sharing: 6 months

Length of time it took to find a match: less than a week

What have you gained from Homesharing? From this home sharing experience I have gained the opportunity to cut back on my living expenses so that I can financially prepare to purchase a home.

Do you see Home sharing as a long term or temporary housing solution?  I am utilizing the home sharing program because I have a desire to purchase a home within this year.

What is something you’ve learned from your Home Provider? What is something you respect about your Home Provider?    I respect the fact that my Home Provider was willing to open her home to my daughter & me. While being in a home were my Home Provider is a home owner I have been able to witness the importance of keeping and maintaining a home. I always knew that it was a lot of responsibility that went into being a home owner, but this experience has giving me an opportunity to see firsthand.

What qualities do you think make a good roommate? A good roommate is one that is very understanding, a good communicator, clean, and friendly.

What do you like best about your house? When I was in the process of searching for a home provider I was very adamant about staying in the same community. I didn’t want to pull my daughter out of the community and environment she was familiar with. The neighborhood is in a central location and in a quiet community surrounded by homeowners.

Is there anything else you’d like to share? I am very grateful for this experience because it is truly a humbling experience. Home sharing is great for any individual that is trying to find some stability and it will only work if you are willing to communicate and be patient. I would recommend home sharing to others. All home sharing experiences may vary.

Complete this sentence: Home is…. Truly a place where you are comfortable and you can relax and feel safe. ‘Home is where the heart is…’

Do you know a single parent or a homeowner who would be willing to open up their heart or their home? Contact the Homesharing department at St. Ambrose 410-366-6180 or via email at homesharing@stambros.org

There’s no place like it.

March 2, 2015 by

St. Ambrose’s consortium of six unique programs can at times leave us all wondering, “What in the name of Baltimore, does St. Ambrose actually do?”  In our 47 year history our different programs have served 120,000 Maryland residents from different neighborhoods, backgrounds, and walks of life. So what binds St. Ambrose’s programs and all of our friends and supporters together?

Home. Home is a place, a state of mind, a goal, a basic need, a sense of well-being, a memory, a scent, a sanctuary.

As a student and lover of both Portuguese and Spanish, I have come to understand that all the best words and expressions are the ones that don’t translate. Home is one of those sweet, unparalleled, not exactly translatable words. The word home doesn’t just refer to a physical structure. Home associates a structure with comfort, safety, or family. It doesn’t matter if you rent an apartment, own your house, or are living in your parent’s basement. Home is yours; it’s something to call your own.

At. St. Ambrose we know that home is something worth fighting for, defending, and working towards. Home is something that unites us, and we’re committed to working together to make home a reality for all.

What does home mean to you? Let us know in the comments.

Happy Thanksgiving from St. Ambrose Hous

November 27, 2014 by

Happy Thanksgiving from St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center! The offices are closed. We will see you Monday

Happy Veterans Day! Thank you for all th

November 11, 2014 by

Happy Veterans Day! Thank you for all that you do and did to keep us safe!

The Rehab Chronicles – 2800 Lake Ave

September 30, 2014 by

2800 Lake Ave is complete and on the market for sale!!

BEFORE

Pre

AFTER

Post

True move-in condition!

Features include:

-3 Bedrooms

-1 ½ New Baths

-New Eat-In Kitchen with:

-> Stainless Steel Appliances

      (To be installed upon sale)

-> Granite Countertop

-New HVAC & HWH

-New Plumbing & Electric

-New Windows & Ceiling Fans

-New Roof & Storm Doors

-Gleaming Hardwood Floors

-Main Level Laundry

-New Washer & Dryer

-Fresh New Paint & Blinds Warranties

For more pictures and information on this property, click the link below:

http://listings.realbird.com/C7B8B8C2/362651.aspx

Mom and Daughter Team Pay It Forward

August 26, 2014 by

No one is happy to start school again; especially if you are a student being sent to school with little more than the clothes on your back. Lakia Diggs knows how it feels to be a student of parents struggling to make ends meet. She wanted to give back to those that may not be able to afford the long list of school supplies. Lakia and her daughter, Sa’Nyia Sherman, a smart and vibrant middle school student of Highlandtown Elementary/Middle School, decided to do something for those students. Sa’Nyia went online to look at the different list of supplies required for each grade. She then separated the bags according to their contents. Lakia raised funds by placing an event on her Facebook page. Shortly, the donations and supplies flooded her home.

When Lakia called around for places to receive the donation she only had one condition; to make sure that her backpacks got into the hands of students who need them. On Tuesday, August 19th Lakia and Sa’Nyia, stopped by St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center, Inc. to drop off 30 backpacks. She got to see the results of their labor. An excited five old choose a pink glittered backpack and began to rummage through it.

“Pencils! Pens! Crayons!” she exclaimed. “A notebook. My mom has a notebook like this.” She said with a smile. “And…I don’t know what this is.” She said as she held up a protractor and gave Sa’Nyia a hug. “Thank you Sa’Nyia.” She said as she sat back down to see the rest of her school supplies.

20140821_151859

The Rehab Chronicles – 2800 Lake Ave

August 13, 2014 by

2800 Lake Avenue looks GREAT!!! The oak flooring has been laid and the rest of the flooring throughout has been refinishedBoth bathrooms are finished and the kitchen cabinets are installed.  Check out how the new renovations are coming along!

To view more on the Rehab Chronicles click here.  To view more on the progress of 2800 Lake Ave click here.

Exterior

Exterior

First flr

First Floor

First flr2

First Floor

Second Flr

Second Floor

Second Flr2

Second Floor

Basement

Basement

Baltimore City Youth Works Program

August 1, 2014 by

Written by Kenyatta

My name is Kenyatta and I am a Baltimore City High School student. Through the Baltimore City YouthWorks program I have been working at St. Ambrose Aid Housing Center this summer. My first project has been working and assisting the staff of Fundraising Department.   I feel achievement when I complete a project I am given and learn more about St. Ambrose and the different elements of it. I never knew there was more work to housing besides helping people live in reasonably priced homes. I always wondered, “How does the organization for housing find the money to change the look of run down or old homes?”

During my first week in the Fundraising Department, I learned that it takes structure, organization, and appreciation to make the things happen, provide the tools we apply to succeed and thank the people who have donated. I feel more appreciative because I am a part of changing other people’s lives for the better. I do plan to one day intern here or even volunteer for a year because I enjoy the structure and opportunity to make a difference.

I have helped the staff by giving part of my time and effort to display proof of our work represented in newspaper articles. I feel others would appreciate and believe that St. Ambrose is doing more than just giving someone a place to live, they’re giving them a home. The stories and emotions I hear from clients that don’t know what other things go on beyond finding the right home is incredible. To hear that I was a part of someone’s life who didn’t know it but helped them to smile and have a better tomorrow, it made me proud and happy to do something special.

I’ve also worked in the Rental Department and have learned how big St. Ambrose is. They have various properties that I’m proud to share that I learned about while sorting files and learning about each location. I’ve learned about ways of getting my own place by looking through different programs and what areas or people to contact. I have also learned about the different types of clients St. Ambrose can help or even direct for referral service.

I’ve enjoyed this experience with a lot of hard hours and focusing on my goal to make my projects excellent. I think everyone can gain a little more knowledge from helping others no matter what the organization is. I believe people can grow, like I have, from this experience and can incorporate more into their daily life. Helping people and change is what makes life better and more joyous. I do hope more people can look at my experience here as a sign of something worth doing and something great.

Sharing Housing with International Guests, a Profitable Cultural Exchange

July 22, 2014 by

by Emma Jornlin

As the U.S.’ baby boomers age, most report wanting to remain in their homes, where they can be near their community. In 2009, the Pew Research Center conducted a survey of adults 65 and older living in Baltimore, found that nine out of ten respondents own their own apartment or home and the majority are very satisfied with their living arrangements.However, many Americans also have dreams of traveling to other countries, something that can be difficult when you are weighed down by a mortgage. A plane ticket to France? Not very feasible when you are stuck with a $1200 mortgage.Homesharing, the idea of renting out a room in your home to a non-related individual, allows homeowners to gain a disposable source of income while participating in a cultural exchange.Maxine Hudley, one of our HomeProviders living in the Belair-Edison neighborhood, has had a positive experience sharing her home with people from other cultures. This past year, she hosted a woman from Ethiopia who spoke little English and couldn’t afford an apartment with her job at 7-11. Over the 16 months sharing her home with Tarik, Maxine earned $6000 in rental income. Tarik, in turn, saved an estimated $11,600 on rent by living with Maxine. The following is an excerpt of an interview Emma Jornlin, a LVC working in the Homesharing program this year, conducted with Maxine. St Ambrose: Why did you decide to share your home?

Maxine: I needed the additional funds. And the great thing about me is I have a big heart.

St. Ambrose: Shared housing, the idea of sharing housing with non-family members, is very popular in other countries. For example, if you study abroad in university anywhere from Germany to Ecuador, you will be invited to stay with a host family. Why do you think it’s less popular in the U.S.?

Maxine: Well, I didn’t know about it until a few years ago. I heard about it on the radio. Then I read this article about a woman sharing her home with a gentlemen and it really impressed me.

St. Ambrose: You’ve shared your home with a number of people from other cultures. How do you communicate when you don’t speak the same language?

Maxine: She (Tarik) had someone who could interpret for her. She would call them up. Also, even though we don’t speak the same language, there’s a million other ways to work things out. Like when she wasn’t locking the door, I couldn’t make myself understood verbally, so I’d take her to the door and show her how to lock it. And she would do the same thing with me. The mattress was lumpy and she took me to the bed to show me. So I went out and bought a new mattress—for both of my Homeseekers.

St. Ambrose: Would you recommend Homesharing to others?

Maxine: Yes. 100%.

 

… and now for our Spanish readersEn Español:Mientras los ‘baby boomers’ de los E.E.U.U. maduran, la mayoría reportan que ellos quieren quedarse en sus casa, donde ellos puedan estar cerca de sus comunidades. En 2009, el Pew Research Center, conducto una investigación de adultos de 65 de edad viviendo en Baltimore, encontrando que nuevo de los diez respondientes tienen su propio casa o apartamento y la mayoría están muy satisfechas con sus vivencias.Pero muchos estadounidenses también tienen un sueño de viajar a otros países, algo que puede ser difícil cuando tiene una hipoteca grande. ¿Un vuelo a Francia? No es muy viable cuando Ud. tiene una hipoteca de $1200.Homesharing, el idea de rentar un cuarto en su casa a una persona quien no es familia, permite que el dueño de la casa obtener un fuente de dinero disponible mientras participando en un intercambio cultural.Maxine Hudley, uno de nuestros dueños de casa viviendo en el barrio Belair, ha tenido una buena experiencia compartiendo su casa con una persona de otra cultura. Este ano pasado, a ella alojo una mujer de Ethiopia quien no hablaba mucho inglés y no podía afordar un apartamento con su trabajo en 7-11. En los 16 meses compartiendo su casa con Tarik, Maxine ganó $6000. Tarik guardo $11,600 en renta.St. Ambrose: ¿Por qué decidió Ud. compartir su casa?

Maxine: Yo necesitaba los fondos adicionales. Y lo bueno de mi es que tengo un gran corazón.

St. Ambrose: El idea de compartir una casa con otra persona quien no es familia es muy popular en otros países. Por ejemplo, si Ud. estudia en otro país por su universidad en Alemania hasta Ecuador, le van a invitar a Ud. quedarse con una familia. ¿Por qué piensa Ud. que este concepto no es tan popular en los EEUU?

Maxine: Pues, yo no conocía el concepto antes de unos años atrás. Yo oí un advertismo en el radio. Después, leí un artículo en el periódico de una mujer compartiendo su casa con un hombre y me impresiono mucho.

St. Ambrose: Ud. Ha compartido su casa con gente de otras culturas. ¿Cómo comunica ustedes cuando no hablan el mismo idioma?

Maxine: Ella (Tarik) tenía alguien para interpretar por ella. Les llamaba por el teléfono celular. También, aun cuando nosotros no hablamos el mismo idioma, hay un millón de otras maneras comunicar. Por ejemplo, cuando ella no estaba cerrando la puerta con candado, yo no podía explicarlo verbalmente, entonces yo le llevaría a la puerta y le mostraba como hacerlo. Y a ella hizo lo mismo conmigo. El cochón estaba lleno de grumos y a ella me llevo a la cama para mostrármelo. Y por eso, yo salí a comprar un nuevo cochón—para los dos Home Seekers.

St. Ambrose: ¿Ud. recomendaría Homesharing a otra gente?

Maxine: Sí. 100%.

 

 

For our Spanish readers, connect with Southeast CDC for help purchasing a home


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 419 other followers